Students Protest Cancellation of Intersession

After the announcement that intersession was cancelled, a spontaneous group of students marched in protest in the alley behind the law school. The students were frustrated with an administration that they say has stifled their demands to learn about the law. Hubert Descartes (2L) said, “I was all prepared to finally learn about the law in a classroom, but I guess that cannot happen now. I am so tired of the administration only letting me pursue my hobbies and spend time with friends.”

Some students were distraught at their loss of access to professors at intersession. Marshall Plutocrat (1L) lamented the lost connections that could have arisen at intersession: “Intersession would have allowed me to have the opportunity to network with lawyers and professors. When else in law school or as a lawyer will I possibly have the opportunity to meet any lawyers?”

Professor Richard Stacey had said at the student townhall that the intersession would set off “intellectual fireworks” (Editor’s note: that actually did happen). Now students felt that the sparks in their brains had diminished. Colin Marshmallow (3L) felt that the school ruined an opportunity to stimulate the minds of the students, saying, “When we learn things in two months, we all forget everything before the exam. Everyone knows the best way to learn about something is to go to class for only two weeks. Then write a paper about it like a month later.”

The mood at the protest was not one of despair, but rather of optimism for the future. Future law student Lionel Insufferable was confident that by the time he was at the law school, the intersession would be in place, and he went even further than that: “I am pretty sure that by the time I am a 2L, we will have intersession. I am hoping they go even further, and eliminate winter vacation and no-class Fridays altogether. I want to spend every possible moment learning about the law and making week-long connections with interchangeably prestigious professors.”

While these students were down, they know the fight is not over. The administration will undoubtedly be bringing back intersession, because, after all, how else can students possibly learn about the law?