Exit Thoughts: Apr1L

Suhasini Rao (1L)

It’s dangerous to reflect in the middle of March.

Depending on who you are, the summer job hunt starts roughly in January. By March, offer in hand or not, everyone develops a reflexive ability to type “thank you for your consideration” at the end of emails.[1] Whether the job hunt has ended for you, or is still going on, the middle of March is only a few weeks away from April exams.

So if you sit down to reflect in March, such reflection may provide a dangerous amount of calm. Extracurriculars are wrapping up, there are only a few weeks of classes left, and you can almost feel the Sun on your skin. Still, April looms around the corner.

Nevertheless, because of my innate thoughtfulness,[2] I undertook the dangerous task of reflecting on the year since August. We’ve somehow arrived at the end of a school year. For the 1Ls, this has meant an overabundance of hugs, cookies, and peer support.[3] For the upper-years, this has probably meant sassy group messages, screenshots of online drama, and their own version of ‘The Lottery’.[4]

Since starting school, terms like volenti non fit injuria have become a little easier to digest, studying seems to make a little bit more sense, and the word ‘reasonable’ has worked its way into my daily vocabulary. There are not too many major complaints for this year.[5] Acquaintances will occasionally ask me for ‘legal’ advice I can’t actually give.[6] Polite strangers will inform me that University of Toronto’s law school is actually called Osgoode, and I’m misinformed. My shoelaces sometimes come undone when I’m walking, but that one is on me.

Good luck with exams. And, if I can ever provide any help (hugs, cookies, and peer support), as a card carrying 1L, I’m obligated to do so.

[1] Unless the job is with an academic in Contract Law. Then it’s not a reflex, you did it on purpose.

[2 ] Procrastination.

[3] #booniegate never happened. [Hashtag credit: C Miller]

[4] à la Shirley Jackson, not OLG.

[5] Major: something that is  > $36,440.36.

[6] I don’t know what your landlord can or can’t do. I don’t know your landlord.